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Watch something different this weekend!

Under - Art, Media, My Musings

If you are planning to watch something different this weekend then I have three movie recommendations for you.

Le scaphandre et le papillon (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly)

This intense and moving French movie is based on the memoirs of Elle France editor Jean-Dominique Bauby, who suffered a stroke at the age of 43, paralyzing his entire body except his left eye. Being trapped in his body he blinked out his entire experience in a book.

Le scaphandre et le papillon (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly)

Le scaphandre et le papillon (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly)

Excellent photography by Janusz Kaminski would make you feel as being part of Bauby in his experience of life within confinement of his own body. Having watched this movie you would only appreciate and understand simple pleasures in life that we take for granted.

I haven’t seen many French movies but this appears to be an excellent piece of French cinematography to me and one of the best movies in years I watched.

The Story of the Weeping Camel

The very first thing I wanted to know when looked at this movie’s title was what made my wife to recommend this! But, having seen it, I have no problem recommending it to everyone, everyone who wants to appreciate simplicity of life.

The Story of the Weeping Camel

The Story of the Weeping Camel

Gobi desert (Mongolia) is one of the least known places in the world and this documentary drama is around a family of nomadic shepherds who wanted to save life of a rare white camel calf that was rejected by its mother. Better summarised by TNS at IMDb:

A family of nomadic shepherds assists the births of their camel herd. One of the camels has an excruciatingly difficult delivery but, with help from the family, out comes a rare white colt. Despite the efforts of the shepherds, the mother rejects the newborn, refusing it her milk and her motherly love. When any hope for the little one seems to have vanished, the nomads send their two young boys on a journey through the desert, to a backwater town in search of a musician who is their only hope for saving the colt’s life.

The movie tempo is quite slow (so as life in desert) with quite an emotional ending.

Dancer in the dark

I’ve been listening Björk since ‘Play Dead’. Never knew this Icelandic signer is also gifted with acting talent that was truly evident in her only movie (so far) ‘Dancer in the Dark’ wining her several Best Actress awards. The movie might be a bit grim and depressing for some. It is a musical around an East European immigrant to United States in early 1960s, which was going blind with a 12 years old son.

Selma (Björk) is a Czechoslovakian immigrant, a single mother working in a factory in rural America. Her salvation is her passion for music, specifically, the all-singing, all-dancing numbers found in classic Hollywood musicals. Selma harbors a sad secret: she is losing her eyesight and her son Gene stands to suffer the same fate if she can’t put away enough money to secure him an operation. When a desperate neighbor falsely accuses Selma of stealing his savings, the drama of her life escalates to a tragic finale. (Summary from IMDb)

Dancer in the dark

Dancer in the dark

Frozen in time by Prokudin-Gorsky

Under - Inspiration, Photography
The village of Kolchedanskoye - 1912

The village of Kolchedanskoye - 1912

I came across Prokudin-Gorsky’s work while doing some research on hand colouring old/antique black and white pictures from the early 20th century. While most of the work is black and white from that time, a number of photographers experimented with three colour photography technique that was developed in the late 19th century.

Prokudin-Gorsky documented the then Russian Empire (1905-1916) with everyday life in his pioneering colour photography. With the Tsar’s blessing, he spent around 10 years photographing Russia and its people in colours.

His process used a camera that took a series of three monochrome pictures in sequence, each through a different coloured filter. By projecting all three monochrome pictures using correctly-coloured light, it was possible to reconstruct the original colour scene. Any stray movement within the camera’s field of view showed up in the prints as multiple “ghosted” images, since the red, green and blue images were taken of the subject at slightly different times.

Mugan (Family settler) Grafovka village - taken somewhere in between 1905 to 1916

Mugan (Family settler) Grafovka village - taken somewhere in between 1905 to 1916

Mohammed Alim Khan, Emir of Bukhara - 1911

Mohammed Alim Khan, Emir of Bukhara - 1911

Prokudin-Gorsky is best known for the only colour portrait of Tolstoy but his colour photography is indeed a timeless snapshot of the past. I felt lost in many of his pictures.

View more of his photography at Flickr.

At the stubble-field - 1909

At the stubble-field - 1909

Oh geez – it’s hurting!

Under - Media, Technology

The latest series of Microsoft’s ‘Laptop Hunters‘ ads are really hurting Apple!

Some are suggesting otherwise though.

Future is all Chrom-atic!

Under - Motion Graphics, Technology

As a designer I don’t like the fact that now I’ll have to worry about one more browser for compatibility but I like Google Chrome! It still has a long way to become a mainstream player but you can bet the future is not that far.

Google puts together few short films on their YouTube channel that are also going to be aired on some TV netwroks. Is the browser war entering into a new era?

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