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Tag Archives: Digital single-lens reflex camera

AMP camera makes HDR video a reality

Under - Media, Photography, Technology

This was evident – an HDR video camera! We have seen the Highly Dynamic Range video concept with two DSLRs here and then painstakingly done frame by frame here. Contrast Optical Design & Engineering Inc. recently introduced a groundbreaking and fundamentally new technology in the form of an HDR video camera that is poised to change the HDR imagery landscape. AMP’s HDR video Camera shoots 1080p at 24ps or 30fps video with RAW data.

The AMP philosophy is to preserve all the content and information in a scene, thus giving the artist as much raw material to work with. To this end, we developed the AMP camera and video system. AMP uses a novel optical engine to split the light from a single camera lens onto three digital video sensors. AMP can produce a true, high-dynamic range (HDR) image for every single frame in the video stream. And the best news is: that’s just the beginning.

AMP captures three widely spaced exposures in order to extend the dynamic range of the camera and produce images that are as close as possible to what the human eye can experience.

The AMP HDR Camera is available later this year but it wouldn’t be a mass-produced product.

18 September 3

HDR video by Soviet Montage

Under - Inspiration, Media, Photography, Technology

Although I’m not a big fan of HDR photography but sometime you get to see something really awesome such as this HRD video by Soviet Montage. This seems to be the first ever attempt to create HDR video and the overall effect is intensely dramatic and comic … may be it is meant for videos!

This video highlights several clips we’ve made using our new High Dynamic Range (HDR) process. Video is captured on two Canon 5D mark II DSLRs, each capturing the exact same subject via a beam splitter. The cameras are configured so that they record different exposure values, e.g., one camera is overexposed, the other underexposed. After the footage has been recorded, we use a variety of HDR processing tools to combine the video from the two cameras, yielding the clips you see above.

HDR Video Demonstration Using Two Canon 5D mark II cameras