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20 March 2
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Colosseo – a typographic rendition

Under - Art, Design, Illustration, Inspiration, Typography

Cameron Moll’s rendition of the Roman Coliseum is as engaging as all of his previous typography work has been. Painstakingly handcrafted character by character, the artwork took almost 12 months to finish totaling roughly 250 hours from start to finish.

Colosseo - Cameron Moll

Colosseo - Cameron Moll

Colosseo (detail)

Colosseo (detail)

Colosseo (detail)

Colosseo (detail)

Characters from the ‘Goudy Trajan’ and ‘Bembo Pro’ typefaces used in the artwork along with glyphs that Cameron recreated based on the work of master Italian calligrapher M. Giovambattista Palatino from around 1550 AD.

Palatino Glyphs Poster (detail)

Palatino Glyphs Poster (detail)

Palatino Glyphs Poster (detail)

Palatino Glyphs Poster (detail)

Palatino Glyphs and Letterpress Posters - Cameron Moll

Palatino Glyphs and Letterpress Posters - Cameron Moll

Letterpress Poster (detail)

Letterpress Poster (detail)

Letterpress Poster (detail)

Letterpress Poster (detail)

Cameron Moll is a designer, speaker, and author living in Sarasota, Florida (United States) with his wife and four sons.

The best part is you can buy the Colosseo poster here if you like.

2 thoughts to “Colosseo – a typographic rendition”

  1. Kenya

    March 24, 2010 at 6:00 am

    Absolutely stunning! :)

  2. artee

    September 4, 2010 at 11:17 pm

    The work here is meticulous, compulsive attention to detail.

    However, I feel it falls short of “perfection” because it appears
    to have been drawn over a photo enlargement of the Colloseum
    in Rome.

    It exhibits a parallax view; the bottom being wider than the top. That’s what happens when shooting “up” from ground level.

    It would perfect (at least from my viewpoint) if the parallax view were corrected by using a camera with a shift-tilt lens to produce a good architectural photo as the basis for the penmanship, OR
    simply compensate for it in the drawing.

    That’s my two cents worth.



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